You should practice preparatory refactoring

When your project reaches midlife and tasks start taking noticeably longer, that’s the time to refactor. Not to radically decouple your software or erect onerous boundaries. Refactor to prepare the code for the next feature you’re going to build. Ron Jeffries, Refactoring — Not on the backlog!

Simples! We take the next feature that we are asked to build, and instead of detouring around all the weeds and bushes, we take the time to clear a path through some of them. Maybe we detour around others. We improve the code where we work, and ignore the code where we don’t have to work. We get a nice clean path for some of our work. Odds are, we’ll visit this place again: that’s how software development works.

Check out his drawings, telling the story of a project evolving from a clear lawn to one overwhelmed with brush. Once your project is overwhelmed with code slowing you down, don’t burn it down. Jeffries says we should instead use whatever work is next to do enabling refactorings to make the project work happens.

Locality is such a strong force in software. What I’m changing this week I will probably change next week too. Thus, it’s likely that refactoring will help the next bit of project work. Repeat several times and a new golden path emerges through your software.

Don’t reach for a new master plan when the effort to change your software goes up. Pave the cow paths through whatever work you’re doing!

The TTY demystified. Learn you an arcane computing history, terminals, shells, UNIX, and even more arcanery! Terminal emulators are about the most reliable, versatile tools in my not-so-modern computing toolkit. It’s nice to know a little more about how they work, besides “lots of magic ending in -TY”, e.g. teletypes, pseudo-terminals, session groups, etc.

Code that resists

Kellan Elliott-McCrea, on the way towards an understanding of technical debt, catalogs the ways we end up with code that resists our efforts to change it:

Therefore the second common meaning of “technical debt” is the features of the codebase we encounter in our work that make it resist change. Examples of features that can make a codebase resist change include: poor modularization, poor documentation or poor test coverage. Just as easily though an abundance of modularization (and complexity) or an abundance documentation, and tests encoding the now the incorrect old behavior can apply a strong downward pressure on change.

A little discussed and poorly understood design goal for code is disposability. Given change, what design patterns can we follow that allow us to quickly expunge incorrect behavior from our codebase? Interestingly it is a much more tractable metric for measuring as opposed to more popular criteria like “elegance”. (a post for another day)

Put that in your thinker. Does something like Strategy or Adapter let you throw out whole classes when they prove unnecessary? Or is that so only when you luck out and chose the exact right axes of disposability? Does a microservice really let you discard codebases wholesale? Can maps and functions free you from intertwingled state and behavior or does it move the resistance somewhere else?

Grumpy, opinionated answers: possibly! Even more possibly! Meh. Very meh.

The future of programming is design, teaching, and empathy

The Future Programming Manifesto starts with this header:

Inessential complexity is the root of all evil

OK, I’m on board!

We should measure complexity as the cumulative cognitive effort to learn a technology from novice all the way to expert. One simple surrogate measure is the size of the documentation.

Perhaps we could describe the complexity of a technology in “bookshelves”? For example, in my second internship I met a CleearCase administrator whose office bookcase had one shelf devoted to SunOS, one shelf to Oracle, and the final shelf dedicated to ClearCase itself. How many bookcases for Ruby, Rails, JS, CSS, a database, and all the other stuff you need to know to put a CRUD app in your browser (not even deploy it to the web!)

  • Maintaining compatibility increases complexity.
  • Technical debt increases complexity.
  • Most R&D is incremental: it adds features and tools and layers. Simplification requires that we throw things away.
  • Computer Science rejects simplification as a result because it is subjective.
  • The Curse of Knowledge: experts are blind to the complexity they have laboriously mastered.
  • Rewarding programmers for their ability to handle complexity selects for those who love it.
  • Our gold-rush economy encourages greed and haste.

A weird thing about programmer is that those that rant endlessly about someone else’s complexity, layers, and haste are almost completely blind to the complexity, layers, and haste they make in an effort to set the world just so.

We should work for end-users disenfranchised by lack of programming expertise. We should concentrate on their modest but ubiquitous needs rather than the high-end specialized problems addressed by most R&D. We should take inspiration from end-user tools like spreadsheets and HyperCard. We should avoid the trap of designing for ourselves.

What if more of programming was accessible as data manipulation (cf. spreadsheets, data files, JSX templates) instead of as logic and behavior (i.e. almost every programming language)?

We are doing Design: using experience and judgement to make complex tradeoffs in order to satisfy qualitative human needs.

This reminds me of Developer Experience. “Developer experience” is a weird word right now, but it’s becoming table stakes for success. It’s a design discipline. It’s considering the form and function of code. It’s the opposite of attempting to learn C ;)

Long story short: we’re gonna need more empathy, more design skills, and more teaching skills to reach the next level of great programming languages and tools.

Multiplication over management

When a developer becomes a manager, It’s not a promotion, it’s a career change:

If you want to do your leadership job effectively, you will be exercising a vastly different set of skills on a daily basis to what you are exercising as an engineer. Skills you likely haven’t developed and are unaware of.

Your job is not to be an engineer. Your job is not to be a manager. Your job is to be a multiplier.

Don’t miss the section on how we undervalue non-technical skills. It’s not unlike developing software, it’s just that your levers are people and processes instead of software and data centers. See also, Managing Humans.

The wolf moves fast…

The Wolf:

The Wolf moves fast because he or she is able to avoid the encumbering necessities of a group of people building at scale. This avoidance of most things process related combined with exceptional engineering ability allows them to move at speed which makes them unusually productive. It’s this productivity that the rest of the team can… smell. It’s this scent of pure productivity that allows them to further skirt documentation, meetings, and annual reviews.

See also, The Grinder.