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The future of programming is design, teaching, and empathy

The Future Programming Manifesto starts with this header:

Inessential complexity is the root of all evil

OK, I’m on board!

We should measure complexity as the cumulative cognitive effort to learn a technology from novice all the way to expert. One simple surrogate measure is the size of the documentation.

Perhaps we could describe the complexity of a technology in “bookshelves”? For example, in my second internship I met a CleearCase administrator whose office bookcase had one shelf devoted to SunOS, one shelf to Oracle, and the final shelf dedicated to ClearCase itself. How many bookcases for Ruby, Rails, JS, CSS, a database, and all the other stuff you need to know to put a CRUD app in your browser (not even deploy it to the web!)

  • Maintaining compatibility increases complexity.
  • Technical debt increases complexity.
  • Most R&D is incremental: it adds features and tools and layers. Simplification requires that we throw things away.
  • Computer Science rejects simplification as a result because it is subjective.
  • The Curse of Knowledge: experts are blind to the complexity they have laboriously mastered.
  • Rewarding programmers for their ability to handle complexity selects for those who love it.
  • Our gold-rush economy encourages greed and haste.

A weird thing about programmer is that those that rant endlessly about someone else’s complexity, layers, and haste are almost completely blind to the complexity, layers, and haste they make in an effort to set the world just so.

We should work for end-users disenfranchised by lack of programming expertise. We should concentrate on their modest but ubiquitous needs rather than the high-end specialized problems addressed by most R&D. We should take inspiration from end-user tools like spreadsheets and HyperCard. We should avoid the trap of designing for ourselves.

What if more of programming was accessible as data manipulation (cf. spreadsheets, data files, JSX templates) instead of as logic and behavior (i.e. almost every programming language)?

We are doing Design: using experience and judgement to make complex tradeoffs in order to satisfy qualitative human needs.

This reminds me of Developer Experience. “Developer experience” is a weird word right now, but it’s becoming table stakes for success. It’s a design discipline. It’s considering the form and function of code. It’s the opposite of attempting to learn C ;)

Long story short: we’re gonna need more empathy, more design skills, and more teaching skills to reach the next level of great programming languages and tools.

By Adam Keys

Telling a joke. Typing.